Alpina B6S (E63)

With nearly 500 supercharged horses, this makes more sense than an M6.

If you're a firm fan of the BMW M6 E63, you may be wondering why this Alpina commands such a premium over similarly aged examples from the M Division. After all, it's missing two cylinders and is slightly less powerful. But look at that torque figure... It's also rare – just three right-hookers were built. But is it worth it?

Before we come on to why this car exists, it has to be said that this is a very good example. The bodywork is in fantastic condition, with no blemishes or scratches to be found anywhere.  The bodykit is uncorrupted and we couldn't find any corrosion.   

The enormous, gorgeous 20in alloy wheels have succumbed to a bit of kerbing damage on the passengers' side, though this will be repaired before sale. The Alpina wears Michelin Sport Contact 2s at each corner – 255/35 ZR20s at the front and 285/30 ZR20s at the rear. All have plenty of tread remaining. 

The engine bay is clean and all the fluids are up to their maximum marks; nothing leaks. The service book is well-filled with stamps, pointing to dutiful care over the past decade.


Choose your Alpina E63

  • The Alpina B6 launches in 2007, and uses a 4.4-litre supercharged V8 loosely based on the  645i engine. The engine's matched up to a ZF 6HP26 six-speed gearbox with steering wheel-mounted buttons for manual shifts; it's a system called SWITCH-TRONIC; shift times are 50 per cent quicker than the standard ZF gearbox. It's available in coupe or  convertible formats, though the cabrio takes 0.3 seconds longer to 60mph and is 4mph slower, 'just' 194mph, then.

It's when you step inside that you start to see the benefits of Alpina's touch – it's far more luxurious in here, with beautifully soft cream leather, classy cherry wood and gorgeous blue dials. The driver's seat bolster has recently been refurbished, and the carpet hardly looks used. That same quality is reflected across the rest of the interior. It's a much nicer place to be than the rather austere M6.

It's not lacking for performance, and actually manages to be more exciting than the epicly fast but aloof M6. The supercharged shove is truly eyepopping and though we didn't come near to testing its top speed, we're pretty sure it can reach it. Overall it's far more engaging to drive.

The suspension is set up for cruising, so it's not quite as tight as the M6, but then this is a big GT – the trade-off works to the Alpina's favour. There are no peculiar noises, and the ride comfort is exemplary (a sharp contrast to the jiggly M6). Braking force is sharp yet predictable too. 

The Alpina B6S nails the fast GT much better than the M6; it may not handle as well on the limit, but it's not far off. The M6 can't touch the B6S for comfort and 'specialness', though. This example feels brand-new, and is well worth further scrutiny. 


Alpina B6S in detail

Year  2007
Mileage  35,000
On sale at Vas Vehicle Solutions:  www.vvsuk.co.uk

Specifications

Engine 4398cc/8-cyl/DOHC
Transmission   RWD, 6-speed auto
Power 493bhp@5500rpm
Torque 516lb-ft@4250rpm
Weight  1720kg

Performance

0-60mph         4.6sec
Top speed       198mph
Economy         23mpg


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